G-AMMS, not an Alpha, but alphabet soup again!


G-AMMS

Sorry about the terrible Auster pun at the start of the post, but I could not resist this opportunity. G-AMMS isn’t an Auster J-1N Alpha, of course, but a much changed Aiglet Trainer. Built in 1951 by Auster Aircraft Ltd at Rearsby, it was retained by the company until 1954, being completed as a J5F, then modifed as a J5K (the only such aircraft) and J5L. The airframe was fitted, at various times, with a De Havilland Gipsy Major 1 of 130hp or a Blackburn Cirrus Major 3 of 155hp, and had the Auster Aiglet Trainer’s shortened wingspan (from 36 ft to 32 ft, to increase the aircraft’s roll rate) and strengthened structure to enable aerobatics to be performed. Aiglet Trainers were popular abroad, and the Pakistan Air Force used them in quantity.

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6 comments on “G-AMMS, not an Alpha, but alphabet soup again!”

  1. Very interested to read the history of G-AMMS. Upon retirement from Taylorcraft/Auster/Beagle my father Albert Codling, who was Chief Inspector from 1938 to 1968, formed a partnership with Mr Gus Morris.
    One of the first jobs that they undertook was with G-AMMS in about 1970. I have a Photo showing Albert and Gus loading (or unloading) this aircraft from a transporter. The aircraft has a silver finish with black flashes which it had at that time. I would like to know just what work was done to the aircraft at the time. I guess that it was a recovering job as my father’s business card stated fabric recovering as his speciality. I could send you a JPEG if you would like.

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    • Hi David,
      I would be very much interested in a copy of your father’s picture of G-AMMS as I amm compiling history about this particular aircraft.
      Thank you in advance

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  2. Nice photograph, I had my first ever Auster flight in G-AMMS about three years ago. My second Auster flight was in the Burma Auster III seen behind

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  3. Reblogged this on The Auster Diaries and commented:
    A very famous Auster – as flown by Ranald Porteous – nice little outline here on the Shortfinals blog

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